PM Imran Khan (File Photo).

Web Desk/ISLAMABAD: Imran Ahmad Khan Niazi has been elected as the 19th democratically elected person to become the 22nd Prime Minister of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan, the third consecutive democratic premier in a country marred with a vast dictatorial past.

Ruckus reigned supreme even before the proceedings for the Prime Ministerial election officially got underway.

Newly elected Speaker of the National Assembly had a tough task at his hands when the opposition started sloganeering in favor of their parties and against PTI.

The opposition emphasised that the National Assembly should be cleared of unecessary clutter and those not involved directly with the proceedings should be pushed out of the Assembly as their have been unsavory incidents in the past.

PML-N party members came supporting black armabands showing their disdain for the alleged rigging in the elections and also signifying their lack of trust on the strongest parliamentary party in numbers, PTI.

PPP has opted to abstain from voting for either candidate and kept seated on their parliamantry benches.

Imran Khan secured a tally of 176 votes whereas PM Shehbaz Sharif managed to secure 96 votes, loud chants of “Na Manzoor” (We don’t accept) erupted from the opposers but Imran Khan is now Prime Minister of Pakistan.

Khan was born to a upper-middle class Pashtun family in Lahore, Punjab, in 1952 and educated at Aitchison, Worcester, and later at Keble College, Oxford. Khan started playing cricket at the age of 13. Initially playing for his college and later for the Worcestershire Cricket Club, he made his debut for the Pakistan national cricket team at the age of 18 during the 1971 series against England at Edgbaston, Birmingham. After graduating from Oxford, Khan made his home debut for Pakistan in 1976, and played until 1992. Khan also served as the team’s captain intermittently throughout 1982–1992. He, notably, led Pakistan to victory at the 1992 Cricket World Cup, Pakistan’s first and only victory in that competition.

Khan retired from cricket in 1992 as one of Pakistan’s most successful players. In total he made 3,807 runs and took 362 wickets in Test cricket, and is one of eight world cricketers to have achieved an ‘All-rounder’s Triple’ in Test matches. He was later, in 2010, inducted into the ICC Cricket Hall of Fame. In 1991, he launched a fundraising campaign to set up a cancer hospital in memory of his mother. He raised $25 million to set up a hospital in Lahore in 1994, and later in 2015 a second hospital in Peshawar. Khan remains a prominent philanthropist and commenter, and served as the chancellor of Bradford University between 2005 and 2014 and was the recipient of an honorary fellowship by the Royal College of Physicians in 2012.

In April 1996, Khan founded the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf, a centrist political party, and became the party’s national leader. Khan contested for a seat in the National Assembly in October 2002 and served as an opposition member from Mianwali until 2007. He was again elected to the parliament in the 2013 elections, when his party emerged as the second largest in the country by popular vote. Khan serves as the parliamentary leader of the party and led the third largest block of parliamentarians in the National Assembly from 2013 to 2018. His party also leads a coalition government in north-western province of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. Khan remains a popular political figure and is the author of, among other publications, Pakistan: A Personal History.

At the height of his career, in 1982, the thirty-year-old Khan took over the captaincy of the Pakistan cricket team from Javed Miandad. As a captain, Khan played 48 Test matches, out of which 14 were won by Pakistan, 8 lost and the rest of 26 were drawn. He also played 139 ODIs, winning 77, losing 57 and ending one in a tie.

During the 1990s, Khan also served as UNICEF’s Special Representative for Sports and promoted health and immunisation programmes in Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Thailand. While in London, he also works with the Lord’s Taverners, a cricket charity. Khan focused his efforts solely on social work. By 1991, he had founded the Shaukat Khanum Memorial Trust, a charity organisation bearing the name of his mother, Mrs. Shaukat Khanum. As the Trust’s maiden endeavour, Khan established Pakistan’s first and only cancer hospital, constructed using donations and funds exceeding $25 million, raised by Khan from all over the world.

On 27 April 2008, Khan established a technical college in the Mianwali District called Namal College. It was built by the Mianwali Development Trust (MDT), and is an associate college of the University of Bradford in December 2005. Imran Khan Foundation is another welfare work, which aims to assist needy people all over Pakistan. It has provided help to flood victims in Pakistan. Buksh Foundation has partnered with the Imran Khan Foundation to light up villages in Dera Ghazi Khan, Mianwali and Dera Ismail Khan under the project ‘Lighting a Million Lives’. The campaign will establish several Solar Charging Stations in the selected off-grid villages and will provide villagers with solar lanterns, which can be regularly charged at the solar-charging stations.

Basing his wider paradigm on the poet-philosopher Muhammad Iqbal and the Iranian writer-sociologist Ali Shariati he came across in his youth, Khan is generally described as a nationalist and a populist. Khan’s proclaimed political platform and declarations include: Islamic values, to which he rededicated himself in the 1990s; liberal economics, with the promise of deregulating the economy and creating a welfare state; decreased bureaucracy and the implementation of anti-corruption laws, to create and ensure a clean government; the establishment of an independent judiciary; overhaul of the country’s police system; and an anti-militant vision for a democratic Pakistan. David Rose described Khan as a threat to the Americans and the feudal lords who have ruled Pakistan for decades.

After the result of Pakistani general election, 2018, Imran Khan said that he will try to remake Pakistan based on the ideology of Muhammad Ali Jinnah.

 

LEAVE A REPLY